8 Ways 80s Kids Got To Their Mates House!


We weren’t old enough to drive, but we needed to get to our friends house, so we had a lot of options for travel! Here are 8 things we used to get around in the 80s! Which of these did you own?

1. Roller Boots

rollerbootsWe all wanted them – some of us were lucky enough to have them and they were awesome! Roller skating is the traveling on surfaces with roller skates. It is a form of recreational activity as well as a sport, and can also be a form of transportation. In fact, as the United States readied for World War II, the government entertained the notion to add roller skates as essential equipment to move infantry around Europe to save gas. Skates generally come in three basic varieties: quad roller skates, inline skates or blades and tri-skates, though some have experimented with a single-wheeled “quintessence skate” or other variations on the basic skate design. In America, this hobby was most popular first between 1935 and the early 1960s and then in the 1970s, when polyurethane wheels were created and disco music oriented roller rinks were the rage and then again in the 1990s when in-line outdoor roller skating, thanks to the improvement made to inline roller skates in 1981 by Scott Olson, took hold

2. Skate Board

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It was Marty McFly and Back to the Future that made us all want a board! I never was brave/stupid enough to try and grab a car’s bumper and hitch a ride!

Skateboarding started in California in the 1950s. The first skateboards were made from roller skates (attached to a board). Skateboarding gained in popularity because of surfing: in fact, skateboarding was initially referred to as “sidewalk surfing”. Initially, skateboards were handmade from wooden boxes and planks by individuals. Companies started manufacturing skateboards in 1959, as the sport became more popular. In postwar America, society was carefree with children commonly playing in the streets. Boards were also continuing to evolve as companies tried to make them lighter, stronger and improve their performance.

Skateboarding is a very individual activity. Skateboarding continues to evolve. Since 2000, due to attention in the media and products like skateboarding video games, children’s skateboards and commercialization, skateboarding has been pulled into the mainstream. As more interest and money has been invested into skateboarding, more skate parks, and better skateboards have become available. In addition, the continuing interest has motivated skateboarding companies have to keep innovating and inventing new things. Skateboarding will appear for the first time in the 2020 Summer Olympics.

3. BMX

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There were many awesome bikes around in the 80s, the Grifter, the Chopper for example, but it was the BMX that reigned supreme! The ultimate BMX for me was the Raleigh Burner, though I never did get one!-( BMX began during the early 1970s in the United States when children began racing their bicycles on dirt tracks in southern California, inspired by the motocross stars of the time. The size and availability of the Schwinn Sting-Ray and other wheelie bikes made them the natural bike of choice for these races, since they were easily customized for better handling and performance. BMX racing was a phenomenon by the mid-1970s. Children were racing standard road bikes off-road, around purpose-built tracks in California. The 1972 motorcycle racing documentary On Any Sunday is generally credited with inspiring the movement nationally in the United States; its opening scene shows kids riding their Sting-Rays off-road. By the middle of that decade, the sport achieved critical mass, and manufacturers began creating bicycles designed especially for the sport.


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