10 Things 80s Girls Will Love Remembering!

4. Colourful Plastic Hair Clips

hairclips

We all remember these clips don’t we? They tended to break very easily!

5. Swatch Watch

swatch

“Swatch” began development in the early 1980s, under the leadership of the then ETA SA’s CEO, Ernst Thomke with a small team of watch engineers led by Elmar Mock and Jacques Müller. Conceived at the beginning as a standard timekeeper in plastic, Franz Sprecher, a marketing consultant hired by Thomke to give the project an outsider’s consideration, sought to create a trendy line of watches with a full brand identity and marketing concept. Swatch was originally intended to re-capture entry level market share lost by Swiss manufacturers during the quartz crisis and the subsequent growth of Japanese companies such as Seiko and Citizen in the 1960s and 1970s, and to re-popularize analog watches at a time when digital watches had achieved wide popularity.

In 1983, the group hired Jacques Irniger – who formerly served as the marketing executive for Colgate, Nestlé- to launch the swatch. In 1997, the Swatch group opened about 60 stores worldwide. The first collection of twelve Swatch models was introduced on 1 March 1983 in Zürich, Switzerland. Initially the price ranged from CHF 39.90 to CHF 49.90 but was standardized to CHF 50.00 in autumn of the same year. Sales targets were set to one million timepieces for 1983 and 2.5 million the year after. With an aggressive marketing campaign and relatively low price for a Swiss-made watch, it gained instant popularity in its home market of Switzerland.Compared to conventional watches, a Swatch was 80% cheaper to produce by fully automating assembly and reducing the number of parts from the usual 91 or more to only 51 components.

6. Sindy

Sindy is a British fashion doll created by Pedigree Dolls & Toys in 1963. A rival to Barbie, Sindy’s wholesome look and range of fashions and accessories made it the best-selling toy in the United Kingdom in 1968 and 1970. After Marx Toys’ unsuccessful attempt to introduce Sindy in the United States in the late 1970s, Hasbro bought the rights to Sindy and remodelled the doll to look more American. As a result, the doll’s popularity declined and Barbie manufacturer Mattel filed a lawsuit for copyright infringement, which was settled when Hasbro agreed to remodel Sindy’s face. During the 1990s, Barbie’s share of the doll market continued to grow while Sindy’s diminished, which led to Sindy being delisted from major retailers in 1997. Hasbro returned the doll’s licence to Pedigree, and the doll was relaunched in 1999, manufactured by Vivid Imaginations. Sindy’s 40th anniversary in 2003 saw a new manufacturer, New Moons, and another relaunch and redesign.