10 80s Movies That We Still Love To Watch!


In our opinion the 80s was the golden era of movie making. The films were original, they captured our imaginations and made us want to be those characters!

The lack of CGI made them all more believable, and the story telling was amazing because of this.

Of course there were some bad 80s movies but there were lots of great 80s movies. Some of them are a fond memory and some of them you just can’t help watching over and over again! Here is a list of 10 80s movies we still can’t get enough of.

1. The Goonies (1985)

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The Goonies is a 1985 American adventure comedy film directed by Richard Donner, who produced with Harvey Bernhard. The screenplay was written by Chris Columbus from a story by executive producer Steven Spielberg. A band of kids who live in the “Goon Docks” neighborhood of Astoria, Oregon, attempt to save their homes from demolition, and, in doing so, discover an old Spanish map that leads them on an adventure to unearth the long-lost fortune of One-Eyed Willy, a legendary 17th-century pirate. During the entire adventure, they are chased by a family of criminals, who also want the treasure for themselves.

Warner Bros. released it on June 7, 1985, in the United States. The film grossed $61.5 million worldwide and has become a cult film. In 2017, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”

2. Adventures In Baby Sitting (A Night On The Town) (1987)

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After her boyfriend Mike cancels their anniversary date, Chris Parker invites her friend Brenda over to her Oak Park, Illinois, house to cheer her up, but is convinced by her mother to babysit the Andersons’ daughter, 8-year-old Sara, while they attend a party in downtown Chicago. Fifteen-year-old Brad Anderson is supposed to go to his friend Daryl Coopersmith’s house to spend the night, but he changes his mind when he finds that Chris is the sitter. After receiving a frantic phone call from Brenda, who ran away to the bus station downtown, Chris plans to go alone to pick her up but is coerced by Brad, Sara, and Daryl to take them with her. On the freeway, their station wagon suffers a flat tire and they are picked up by a tow truck driver, “Handsome” John Pruitt, who offers to pay for the tire when Chris realizes she left her purse at the Andersons’. En route, Pruitt gets a call from his boss Dawson with evidence that his wife is cheating on him, and he rushes to his house to confront the infidelity; Chris’s mother’s car is damaged when Pruitt accidentally shoots out the windshield while aiming to kill his wife’s lover. Chris and the kids hide in the adulterer’s Cadillac, which is then car-jacked by a thief named Joe Gipp.

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Reaching their hideout in the South Side, the kids realize they have stumbled upon a chop shop, and Joe is chided by Graydon, the operation’s second-in-command, for bringing witnesses. They are detained in an upstairs office but escape. They enter a blues club where the band on stage won’t let them leave until they sing the blues. Chris, Brad, Sara, and Daryl recount their events that night to the audience and are allowed to leave, just as Graydon, Gipp, and their boss Bleak catch up

 

3. Big (1988)

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We all wanted to have a go at playing chopsticks on that giant piano! We wanted to be Big too, we didn’t realise at the time how great being a kid was. I absolutely loved this movie! Shimmy Shimmy Co-co Pop!

Twelve-year-old Josh Baskin, who lives with his parents and infant sister in Cliffside Park, New Jersey, is told he is too short for a carnival ride called the Ring of Fire, while attempting to impress Cynthia Benson, an older girl. He puts a coin into an unusual antique arcade fortune teller machine called Zoltar Speaks, and makes a wish to be “big”. It dispenses a card stating “Your wish is granted”, but Josh is spooked to see it was unplugged the entire time.

The next morning, Josh has been transformed into a 30-year-old man. He tries to find the Zoltar machine, only to see an empty field, the carnival having moved on. Returning home, he tries to explain his predicament to his mother, who refuses to listen and then threatens him, thinking he is a stranger who kidnapped her son. Fleeing from her, he then finds his best friend, Billy Kopecki, and convinces him of his identity by singing a rap that only they know. With Billy’s help, he learns that it will take a long time to find the machine, so Josh rents a flophouse room in New York City and gets a job as a data entry clerk at MacMillan Toy Company.
Josh runs into the company’s owner, Mr. MacMillan, at FAO Schwarz, and impresses him with his insight into current toys and his childlike enthusiasm. They play a duet on a foot-operated electronic keyboard, performing “Heart and Soul” and “Chopsticks.” This earns Josh a promotion to a dream job: getting paid to test toys as Vice President in charge of Product Development. With his promotion, his larger salary enables him to move into a spacious luxury apartment, which he and Billy fill with toys, a rigged Pepsi vending machine dispensing free drinks, and a pinball machine. He soon attracts the attention of Susan Lawrence, a fellow MacMillan executive. A romance begins to develop, to the annoyance of her ruthless former boyfriend and coworker, Paul Davenport. Josh becomes increasingly entwined in his “adult” life by spending time with her, mingling with her friends, and being in a steady relationship. His ideas become valuable assets to MacMillan Toys; however, he begins to forget what it is like to be a child, and he never has time to hang out with his best friend Billy because of his busy schedule.

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MacMillan asks Josh to come up with proposals for a new line of toys. He is intimidated by the need to formulate the business aspects of the proposal, but Susan says she will handle the business end while he comes up with ideas. Nonetheless, he feels pressured, and longs for his old life. When he expresses doubts to her and attempts to explain that he is really a child, she interprets this as fear of commitment on his part, and dismisses his explanation.

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